India Boost for Renewable development

Following in the footsteps of international success, India has now joined the list of countries that has adopted an attractive feed-in tariff for renewable power generation. It is no coincidence, its the the very same mechanism that drove a sluggish German renewable sector from obscurity to world leader status.

Unlike China’s tariff policy supporting wind, the Indian feed-in tariff is inclusive covering small hydro, solar systems, biogas, cogeneration, and waste to energy technologies subject to approval by the regulatory commission.

CDM
During the first year of operation the developer enjoys 100% of the potential carbon credit under CDM. However every year thereafter, an additional 10% up to a maximum of fifty (50%), must be shared with the utility.

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– John Herbert, Consultant, Kelcroft E&M Limited
helping lower the cost and impact of doing business in Asia

Productivity in green buildings?

An interesting survey from USA, adds more weight to benefit of building green or does it?  This report “Workers in green buildings take less sick leave” from Green Building Press states that a survey found that workers in green buildings were found to be more productive.

Now, one could argue that is one of the primary aims for building green, the largest cost centre is your employees, therefore even minor productivity improvements equates to a valuable dollar return for employers.

However, two points to consider.

First defining and measuring “productivity” is no simple matter, it’s a very subjective, unlike objective equipment meter readings, the exercise is wholly dependant on fuzzy variables such as the respondents mood and feelings. Certainly surveys are a useful, and providing snapshot of the current situation, but how will the employees, solar panels, or chiller performance look next year?  The next survey might provide a different outcome.

Secondly, the last part of this report is also instructive, it reveals that the respondents said they would not pay more for a green building!  Therefore, we could conclude that they wouldn’t actually trust the productivity findings, and that measuring workplace productivity remains an elusive goal.  Another possible but unlikely conclusion is that green building has finally become main stream, therefore “extra cost” is not an issue.

Unfortunately, the report doesn’t reveal if respondents would have pay more for a building with proven, independently verified, cost, energy, water, and carbon savings.

– John Herbert, Consultant, Kelcroft E&M Limited
helping lower the cost and impact of doing business in Asia